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FSUCML Faculty Member
Dean Grubbs Dr. Dean Grubbs
Associate Research Faculty
Associate Director of Research

Office: 850-697-2067
Fax: 850-697-3822
E-mail: dgrubbs@bio.fsu.edu

Grubbs Laboratory

 

 





RESEARCH AND PROFESSIONAL INTERESTS

My primary research interests are in ichthyology and marine ecology with emphasis on the biology of exploited estuarine and marine fishes. Much of my research addresses specific questions or fills specific biological gaps necessary for management of fisheries resources, especially elasmobranch fishes. As a primary tool, I use fishery-independent survey methods to study population dynamics, life histories, and distribution patterns of fishes. I also use conventional mark-recapture studies and modern telemetry techniques to acquire data on movement patterns, habitat use, residency and philopatry. A principal goal of this line of research is to delineate essential and vulnerable habitats, especially in estuaries and nearshore marine environments. For example, my work in Virginia led to the federal designation of a Habitat Area of Particular Concern (HAPC) for juvenile sandbar sharks in the lower Chesapeake Bay, a highly vulnerable area that serves as a primary and secondary nursery for this large coastal species. While my work in these areas has primarily involved coastal sharks, I have been involved in projects that included diverse taxa such as estuarine teleosts and terrestrial reptiles.

I also have immense interest in the biology of pelagic and deepwater fishes. Areas of research have included the behavioral and trophic ecology of tropical tunas, the relationship between intermediate seamounts and pelagic predators, the impact of industrial-scale fisheries on the trophic dynamics of pelagic ecosystems, and the role of mesopelagic communities in oceanic ecosystems. My deepwater research is in its infancy but includes studies of life histories, reproductive biology, and movement patterns of elasmobranchs associated with island and continental slopes. I currently have projects in the central Pacific, western Atlantic, and Caribbean investigating various aspects of the biology of bluntnose sixgill sharks (Hexanchus griseus), bigeye sixgill sharks (H. nakamurai), deepwater stingrays (Plesiobatis daviesi), and short-spined spurdogs (Squalus mitsukurii).

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

Carlson, J.K., S.J.B. Gulak, C.S. Simpfendorfer, R.D. Grubbs, J.G. 
Romine and G.H. Burgess. 2013. Habitat use and movement patterns of smalltooth sawfish, Pristis pectinata, determined using pop-up satellite archival tags. Aquatic Conserv: Mar. Freshw. Ecosyst.DOI: 
10.1002/aqc.2382

Fisher, R.A., G.C. Call, R.D. Grubbs. 2013. Age, Growth, and Reproductive Biology of Cownose Rays in Chesapeake Bay, Marine and Coastal Fisheries: Dynamics, Management, and Ecosystem Science, 5:1,
224-235

Giresi, M.M., R.D. Grubbs, D.S. Portnoy, J.R. Gold. 2013. A Morphological Key to Distinguish Among Smoothhound Sharks (Genus
Mustelus) in the Gulf of Mexico. Proceedings of the Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute. Vol. 65. 143-146.

Jennings, D.E., J.D. DiBattista, K.L. Stump, N.E. Hussey, B.R. Franks, R.D. Grubbs,  S.H. Gruber. 2012. Assessment of the aquatic biodiversity of a threatened coastal lagoon at Bimini, Bahamas. 
Journal of Coastal Conservation 16:205-428.

Cotton, C.F., R.D. Grubbs, T.S. Daly-Engel, P.D. Lynch, J.A. Musick. 
2011. Age, growth and reproduction of Squalus cf. mitsukurii from Hawaiian waters. Marine and Freshwater Research 62: 1-12

Fisher, R.A., G.C. Call, R.D. Grubbs. 2011. Cownose ray (Rhinoptera
bonasus) predation relative to bivalve ontogeny. J. Shellfish Research
30(1): 187-196.

Veríssimo, A, D. Grubbs, J. McDowell, J. Musick, D. Portnoy. 2011. 
Frequency of multiple paternity in the spiny dogfish Squalus acanthias off the southeast U.S.in the western North Atlantic. Journal of Heredity 102: 88-93

Grubbs, R.D., R.T. Kraus.  2010.  Migrations in Fishes.  Encyclopedia of Animal Behavior. Breed, M. D. & Moore, J. eds, Academic Press, Oxford. Vol 1: 715-724.

Grubbs, R.D. 2010 Chapter 7. Ontogenetic Shifts in Movements and Habitat Use. In Carrier JF, Musick JA, Heithaus MR (eds.). Sharks and Their Relatives II: Biodiversity, Adaptive Physiology, and Conservation, CRC Press, New York, New York, USA. pp. 319-350.

Daly-Engel T.S., R.D. Grubbs, K.A. Feldheim, B.W. Bowen, and R.J. 
Toonen. 2010. Is multiple mating beneficial or unavoidable? Low multiple paternity and genetic diversity in the shortspine spurdog (Squalus mitsukurii). Marine Ecology Progress Series 403: 255-267.

Grubbs, R.D. and J.A. Musick. 2007. Spatial delineation of summer nursery areas for juvenile sandbar sharks in Chesapeake Bay, Virginia. 
In: C.T. McCandless, N.E. Kohler and H.L. Pratt, Jr. (editors). Shark nursery grounds of the Gulf of Mexico and the East Coast waters of the United States. American Fisheries Society Symposium 50: 63–86.

Grubbs, R.D., J.A. Musick, C.L. Conrath, and J.G. Romine. 2007. 
Long-term movements, migration, and temporal delineation of summer nurseries for juvenile sandbar sharks in the Chesapeake Bay region. 
In: C.T. McCandless, N.E. Kohler and H.L. Pratt, Jr. (editors). Shark nursery grounds of the Gulf of Mexico and the East Coast waters of the United States. American Fisheries Society Symposium 50: 87–108.

Daly-Engel, T.S., R.D. Grubbs, B.W. Bowen and R.J. Toonen. 2007. 
Frequency of multiple paternity in an unexploited tropical population of sandbar sharks (Carcharhinus plumbeus). Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 64: 198-204.

Graham, B., D. Grubbs, K. Holland, and B. Popp. 2007. A rapid ontogenetic shift in the diet of juvenile yellowfin tuna from Hawai’i. 
Marine Biology 150: 647-658.

Daly-Engel, T.S., R.D. Grubbs, K.N. Holland, R.J. Toonen, B.W. Bowen. 
2006. Assessment of multiple paternity in single litters from three species of carcharhinid sharks in Hawai’i. Environmental Biology of Fishes 76: 419-424.

Romine, J.G., R.D. Grubbs and J.A. Musick. 2006. Age and growth of the sandbar shark, Carcharhinus plumbeus, in Hawaiian waters through vertebral analysis. Environmental Biology of Fishes 77: 229-239.

Burgess, G.H., L.R. Beerkircher, G.M. Cailliet, J.K. Carlson, E. 
Cortés, K.J. Goldman, R.D. Grubbs, J.A. Musick, M.K. Musyl, and C.A. 
Simpfendorfer. 2005. The decline of shark populations in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico: Fact or Fiction? Fisheries 30 (10): 
19-26.

Burgess, G.H., L.R. Beerkircher, G.M. Cailliet, J.K. Carlson, E. 
Cortés, K.J. Goldman, R.D. Grubbs, J.A. Musick, M.K. Musyl, and C.A. 
Simpfendorfer. 2005. Reply to "Robust estimates of decline for pelagic shark populations in the Northwest Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico" 
Fisheries 30 (10): 30-31.

GRADUATE STUDENTS:

  • Jo Imhoff (Biological Science)
  • Cheston Peterson (Biological Science)
  • Travis Richards (Biological Science)
  • Bianca Prohaska (Biological Science)
  • Brendan Talwar (Biological Science)
  • Ale Mickle (Earth Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences)

FORMER GRADUATE STUDENTS:

  • Lisa Hollensead (FSU, MSc, now at University of North Carolina, Wilmington, seeking Ph. D.)
  • Matthew Kolmann (FSU, MSc, now at University of Toronto seeking Ph. D.)